Dill Chips

July 12, 2007 at 2:38 pm 2 comments

This morning I gathered dill weed heads for Dill Chips. Hubby and I love dill pickles so much better than sweet pickles.


dill, basil, parsley and oregano

While my cucumbers soaked in ice water for a couple of hours I worked on freezing some basil, oregano, and parsley along with some dill weed. My curly parsley is doing so much better than my flat leaf and I don’t know why.

This pickle recipe I use does not call to soak your cucumbers, but I feel the pickle is crisper if you do for at least 2 hours.

I leave out the garlic because I’m not a fan of garlic in dill pickles and up the dill heads to about 3 per jar. The pickling spice I use has plenty of bay leaf, so I also omit that.

I use coffee filters for the spice bag and they work just fine.

The recipe says it yields about 5 pints. I end up with 4 pints and 1 quart, with enough brine left over to refrigerate a small amount of onion in. I love onion refrigerated in dill brine.


Dill Slices

4 pounds medium cucumbers
3/4 cup sugar
1/2 cup Canning & Pickling Salt
4 cups cider vinegar, 5% acidity
4 cups water
3 tablespoons mixed pickling spices
5 bay leaves
5 garlic cloves
2 1/2 teaspoons mustard seed
Green or dry dill – (1 head per jar)

Prepare Ball brand or Kerr brand jars and closures according to manufacturer instructions.

Wash cucumbers and remove 1/16-inch from blossom end. Cut into 1/4-inch slices. Combine sugar, salt, vinegar and water in a large sauce pot. Tie pickling spices in a spice bag; add spice bag to vinegar mixture and simmer 15 minutes.

Pack cucumber slices into hot jars, leaving 1/4-inch head space. Add to each jar; one bay leaf, one garlic clove, 1/2 teaspoon mustard seed and one head of dill. Heat pickling liquid to boiling. Remove from heat.

Carefully ladle hot pickling liquid over cucumber slices, leaving 1/4-inch head space. Remove air bubbles with a nonmetallic spatula. Wipe jar rim clean. Place lid on jar with sealing compound next to glass. Screw band down evenly and firmly just until a point of resistance is met — fingertip tight.

Process 15 minutes in a boiling water canner. At elevations higher than 1,000 feet, boil 2 additional minutes for each additional 1,000 feet elevation. (my note- a water bath seal works fine rather than 15 minutes in a canner)

This recipe yields about 5 pints.

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2 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Katiez  |  July 13, 2007 at 3:55 pm

    I have to make my own dill pickles as they don’t exist here. Neither do pickling cukes or dill, so I really do it from scratch.
    I have a great crop of dill this year, for the first time. Should have seed heads in another week or two… about the same time I’ll have the little pickles. This will be a first. In past years they’ve never been ready together. Probably means none of the jars will seal…
    Like your recipe. I’ve not made chips before but I think I’ll try yours. Would be great for sandiches!

    Reply
  • 2. Coffee & Vanilla  |  July 26, 2007 at 9:54 am

    In Poland my mother used to make cucumbers like this but she was using whole little cucumbers. They were delicious & crunchy… my favorite after 3 days, half pickled (!)
    I have recipe on the side on my table for a longer while now but here in London I can’t find anywhere those little cucumbers, I will continue looking for them…
    Greetings, Margot

    Reply

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