Posts filed under ‘Gardening’

Garden 2013

Some of our garden harvest so far this year.

July 24, 2013 at 7:37 am 1 comment

Giant Marconi Peppers

This is the first year we have grown these peppers. You can see from the picture how large they are. The bell pepper beside the Marconi is very large in itself.

I plan on throwing together a spanish rice and chicken stuffing for them this evening. I will try to post what I come up with later.

September 17, 2012 at 9:52 am Leave a comment

2010 Garden

The year 2010 has not been a year for Virginia gardens. Spring started off beautiful and green.

But alass the drought has made our crops scarce.
I did manage to put up green beans, and we are getting a few tomato and peppers.

The corn is not looking promising and it just makes one realize how blessed we are that we can run to a store for what we need. Makes me really appreciate our ancestors and the hard times they must have lived through “living off the land”.

On a up note we did have some great vacation time this year.


I just hope 2011 is a better year for Virginia gardens.

August 12, 2010 at 12:07 pm 1 comment

Homegrown Thanksgiving

I always do my deserts the night before Thanksgiving, so I don’t have as much to do on the big day.


Blackberry Jam Swirl Cheesecake


Pumpkin Pie

I was thinking about how much of our ingredients we grew this year.

The pumpkin for pie, blackberries for cheesecake, green beans, potatoes for mashed potatoes, the chard for wilted greens, the corn for corn salad, all the onion, green pepper, and herbs that will be used.

We didn’t grow the brussel sprouts, yams, flour and yeast ( although I could have used my starter but don’t plan to) or any of the meat, eggs or milk.

My food bill for this Thanksgiving was still out of this world, counting all drinks and the few above items.

Next year I need to try and grow the brussel sprouts and yams. I also might look into some chickens for eggs. I don’t wish to be tied to a milk cow however..lol.

A homegrown Thanksgiving takes a lot more than one can imagine offhand. I appreciate the pilgrims a lot more…

November 25, 2009 at 2:12 pm 4 comments

Spring on the Pond- derosa

So glad that spring has sprung here!

We have been harvesting lettuce, chive, onion, mint, thyme, oregano, lemon balm, arugula and radish.

lettuce mixture

lemon balm

chives

thyme

We planted new asparagus but it looks pretty pitiful the first year.

Imagine a 20 foot row of that! Ground needs working!

I so look forward to the growing season and hanging out at our old backyard fishing hole!

Fishing hole painting done with Photoscape! Cool free program!

Come back as the season progresses. We hope to have a lot more wonderful vegetables to show off.

May 13, 2009 at 8:09 am 4 comments

Garden Omelet

We are having some problems with one of our ponds. One flow way has a hole in it and dear hubby is here trying to get it fixed.

The way it all works is the drain way from the upper pond flows into the lower pond through this spillway.

The lower pond spills into the pipe we are having problems with and then runs under our drive and into the creek.

We believe he has it fixed, but we must get some rain to allow the lower pond to fill back up to really see.

What does a working man need to get his day going but a “Garden” omelet with home fries.


Just gather whatever may be in the garden. This one has onions, spinach, some freezer tomatoes (from the garden just delayed a bit), and Mexican tarragon.

Place it all inside a pool of beaten eggs in a greased fry pan.
Fold when it becomes firm. Add some cheese on top.
Fry some potatoes to complete and feed your hungry man before a hard days work.

Now I have a question. This is my first year trying to grow rhubarb. Just look at these leaves.

Why do they have holes? Aren’t rhubarb leaves suppose to be poison, so what would eat holes in them? Do they normally grow that way maybe?

I searched the web and even found insect spray to make from rhubarb leaves, so I wouldn’t think insects would be eating at them. Would they? I hope someone can help me.

Here is an insecticide recipe.

Rhubarb Insecticide: Boil up one pound of rhubarb leaves in a few pints of water for about 20 minutes, allow to cool, and then strain the liquid into a spray bottle. Add some dish detergent (not laundry detergent) and spray on leaves to kill bugs like aphids and spider mites.

The above taken from Insecticide Link

PS note added later- I found my problem..


The first indications of Ascochyta leaf spot are numerous small yellowish-green areas on the upper surface of the leaves. Within a week of initial symptoms, the leaf tissue turns brown and dies resulting in angular spots. These spots have white centers surrounded by red zone and then a grayish-green zone. Often the dead tissue will drop out giving the leaves a shot-hole appearance which may be confused with insect feeding.

A second disease problem that has been common this year is anthracnose stalk rot. First indications of this disease are wilted leaves and large, water-soaked lesions on the stems. The lesions quickly enlarge and turn black. The stems may have a twisted appearance and the whole stem may collapse.

Both of these diseases can be controlled with good sanitation practices. Remove and dispose of infected tissue during the summer and after the first frost. In the case of Ascochyta leaf spot, stems with infected leaves may still be harvested and should be taken first whenever possible. Since both diseases overwinter in infected plant tissue, good sanitation practices should control most of the disease problems.

Found at Link on Rhubarb disease

June 16, 2008 at 11:24 pm 2 comments

Upside Down Update

I was so excited to begin my upside down project!

I was wanting a smaller tomato to try but could not find what I wanted so I ended up using Jubilee. I hope they won’t be too heavy which was hubby’s concern. I am trying two this year in hopes of next year filling a whole side of my deck.

As you can see here I have lots of deck space to hang them, and since we always worry about our dogs laying on our plants outside of a fence, I thought it would work great. They couldn’t lay on the plants unless they learned to fly.

My biggest concern is that this side of our deck only gets the evening/afternoon sun.

I will have more updates as they grow and hopefully I won’t have to report they came crashing out as they mature and get heavier.

While I am at it I’ll show my sage blooms just because I can.

June 4, 2008 at 8:57 am Leave a comment

Older Posts


Posting Calendar

October 2014
M T W T F S S
« Dec    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Currently on Coffee & Cornbread

Coffee & Cornbread Archives

My Flickr Photos

thing2

thing1and2

thing1

More Photos

Blog Visits

  • 214,714 hits

Food Blog Search

What Spice Are You

You Are Cilantro

The bad news is that
there are some people
who can't stand you.
The good news is that
most people love you more
than anything else in the world.
You are distinct, unusual, fresh,
and very controversial.
And you wouldn't have it
any other way.

What Spice Are You?

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.