Posts tagged ‘dill’

Ukrainian Radish Salad

I personally think there is nothing better in the world than taking and transforming garden vegetables from the dirt to the table.

I wanted to try something different with our radishes.

I found this radish salad that used some of our seasonal garden items. Spring onion, dill, and radish grace this salad. It makes a substitute for coleslaw.

I found this somewhere years ago on the net. Can’t remember where or I would give credit and I failed to note it. It had been adapted from Madhur Jaffreys World Vegetarian. I believe a dab of mustard might go well in there, although I haven’t tried to add it yet.


UKRAINIAN RADISH SALAD

2 c. thinly sliced radishes
2 scallions — cut into very fine
rounds
– (use both white &
green parts)
1 clove garlic — finely minced
3 T. fresh dill — finely chopped
1 T. extra virgin olive oil
1/2 t. salt (be generous)
1/4 t. cayenne
1 c. lite sour cream
1/4 t. paprika

Adapted from Madhur Jaffreys World Vegetarian.

In a bowl, toss the radishes, scallions, garlic, dill, extra virgin olive oil, salt, and cayenne. Mix well and then add the sour cream and paprika. Mix well again. Chill at least three hours before serving to let the flavors marry. The final outcome makes a nice alternative to coleslaw.

(makes 3-4 side dish servings)

May 22, 2009 at 12:18 am 9 comments

Independence Days Update

1.Plant something – green beans, lettuce, dill

We have many eggplant but this is the biggest one right now.

Some dill is seeding along with coriander.

dill seed

coriander seed

2. Harvest something – cabbage, zucchini, lots of herbs, lots of hot and sweet peppers, summer squash, onion, lettuce, arugula, carrot, green beans, green tomato, blackberries, cucumber, new potato.

3. Preserve something – frozen squash, zucchini, herbs and breadcrumbs. Frozen and canned blackberries. Zucchini Relish.

I love this relish but halve the recipe because that is all we can use in a season. I use it in my favorite cole slaw recipe, and on hot dogs.

Link to slaw- Cranberry Cole Slaw.

Make sure you use a 5% acidity vinegar!

The first time I made it, I started to use a cheap off brand and thought to check, while the recipe didn’t specify. That vinegar was only a watered down 4%!

I switched off to a 5% cider vinegar and that worked well.


Zucchini Relish

10 cups zucchini chopped
4 cups chopped onion
3 bell pepper chopped
5 tablespoons kosher salt
4 1/2 cups sugar
2 1/2 cups white vinegar ( 5 % acidity!)
1 tablespoon dry mustard
1 teaspoon turmeric
2 tablespoons cornstarch
2 tablespoons celery seed
1 teaspoon nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon ground pepper

Place unpeeled chopped zucchini, chopped onion, chopped bell pepper and salt into a large pot. Cover with water and allow to sit overnight.
Drain water and rinse in cold water. Drain again.
Combine sugar, vinegar,mustard, turmeric, cornstarch, celery seed, nutmeg and ground pepper. Pour over zucchini mixture in pot and cook on low heat about 30 minutes.
Ladle mixture into sterilized pint jars and seal in a boiling water bath.
Yield:
8 pints

4. Prep something – new garden bed

5. Cook something – new! Roast Cauliflower and Green Beans with Dill.



Just take about 1/2 large head cauliflower and break up along with 2 handfuls fresh green beans. Throw it into a covered casserole ( I like to use my cast iron chicken fryer) sprayed with olive oil spray. Top that with a couple of tablespoons fresh dill weed and lemon slices. Salt, pepper and spray with more cooking spray then cover and roast in 375 for about 30 minutes.
To serve remove the lemon slices and grate some parmesan or asiago cheese on top. I can eat this for lunch by itself.

6. Manage your reserves- rotating canned goods

7. Work on local food systems – No

8. Manage waste- Still throwing on compost heap..

9. Learn something new – I have found a way to help rid my kitchen of garden gnats!

Anyone that brings garden veggies into the house has to know you sometimes carry in gnats too.
Just throw your compost waste in a bucket with a lid on the counter, but place the lid on the kitchen counter while filling. When you get ready to carry the waste to the compost heap slap that lid on top and hold down until you get outside. You would be surprise how many gnats you can transfer back out into the open

July 30, 2008 at 3:25 am 8 comments

Dill and Colby Mashed Cauliflower – WHB

Weekend Herb Blogging is being hosted by Maninas: Food Matters. Check them out to see the WHB roundup this week.

Link To WHB Roundup

Since dill is dominating my herb garden right now I figured I needed to
blog about it.

What better way to feature dill than, Weekend Herb Blogging,
the great event started by Kalyn of Kalyn’s Kitchen? For more great WHB roundups check out Kalyn’s archives.

Dill and Colby Mashed Cauliflower is my featured recipe with dill as the featured herb.

Just break a head of cauliflower into florets

and cook in a pressure cooker in salted water about five minutes.

You can save much energy by using a pressure cooker because the cauliflower would normally cook in about 10-15 minutes. But pressure that stuff and cook it in 4-5 minutes.

I own three pressure cookers. One that you see here.

One larger one for my canning and a small microwave cooker.
Here is a pic of the micro cooker.

The one thing you need to watch when pressure cooking is that you keep the steam holes unblocked. See the steam holes on the micropressure cooker.

If they block then BAM..You have problems. If they don’t block then you save energy and time!

After cooking the florets drain them well. Add one tablespoon butter, salt and pepper to taste then add the 2 -3 tablespoons fresh dill. Mash the florets a bit then add one teaspoon lemon juice and 3 tablespoons of heavy cream with the colby.


Dill and Colby Mashed Cauliflower – 4 servings 156 calories each

1 head cauliflower, head — broken up
1 tablespoon butter
1 teaspoon lemon juice
salt and pepper — to taste
3 tablespoons fresh dill weed — chopped
3 tablespoons heavy cream
2 ounces colby cheese — shredded

Break a head of cauliflower into florets and cook in a pressure cooker in salted water about five minutes.
After cooking the florets drain them well.

Add one tablespoon butter, salt and pepper to taste then add the 2 -3 tablespoons fresh dill.
Mash the florets a bit then mix in one teaspoon lemon juice and 3 tablespoons of heavy cream and the shredded colby.

Serve warm.

June 2, 2008 at 10:50 am 21 comments


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